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Posts Tagged ‘GOAP’

Fritz Heckel’s Reactive Teaming

Tuesday, May 25th, 2010

Fritz Heckel, a PhD student in the Games + Learning Group at UNC Charlotte, posted a video (below) on the research he has been doing under the supervision of G. Michael Youngblood. He has been working on using subsumption architectures to create coordination among multiple game agents.

When the video first started, I was a bit confused in that he was simply explaining a FSM. However, when the first character shared a state with the second one, I was a little more interested. Still, this isn’t necessarily the highlight of the video. As more characters were added, they split the goal of looking for a single item amongst them in that they parsed the search space.

This behavior certainly could be used in games… for example, with guards searching for the player. However, this is simply solved using other architectures. Even something as simple as influence mapping could handle this. In fact, Damián Isla’s occupancy maps could be tweaked accordingly to allow for multiple agents in a very life-like way. I don’t know what Fritz is using under the hood, but I have to wonder if it isn’t more complicated.

Obviously, his searching example was only just a simple one. He wasn’t setting out to design something that allowed people to share a searching goal, per se. He was creating an architecture for cooperation. This, too, has been done in a variety of ways. Notably, Jeff Orkin’s GOAP architecture from F.E.A.R. did a lot of squad coordination that was very robust. Many sports simulations do cooperation — but that tends to be more playbook-driven. Fritz seems to be doing it on the fly without any sort of pre-conceived plan or even pre-known methods by the eventual participants.

From a game standpoint, it seems that this is an unnecessary complication.

In a way, it seems that the goal itself is somewhat viral from one agent to the next. That is, one agent in effect explains what it is that he needs the others to do and then parses it out accordingly. From a game standpoint, it seems that this is an unnecessary complication. Since most of the game agents would be built on the same codebase, they would already have the knowledge of how to do a task. At this point, it would simply be a matter of having one agent tell the other “I need this done,” so that the appropriate behavior gets switched on. And now we’re back to Orkin’s cooperative GOAP system.

On the whole, a subsumption architecture is an odd choice. Alex Champandard of AIGameDev pointed out via Twitter:

@fwph Who uses subsumption for games these days though? Did anyone use it in the past for that matter?

That’s an interesting point. I have to wonder if, as is the case at times with academic research, it is not a case of picking a tool first and then seeing if you can invent a problem to solve with it. To me, a subsumption architecture seems like it is simply the layered approach of a HFSM married with the modularity of a planner. In fact, there has been a lot of buzz in recent years about hierarchical planning anyway. What are the differences… or the similarities, for that matter?

Regardless, it is an interesting, if short, demo. If this is what he submitted to present at AIIDE this fall, I will be interested in seeing more of it.

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