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Post-Play'em - Observations on Game AI


Gears of War 2: Cover vs. Running Around

The recent E3 (2011) reminded me that it was time to catch up on some games. Additionally, it reminded me that I really want to comment on the AI of the games that I play—something that I haven’t been doing as much of lately… at least not on here. So, after having not touched it for a while (2 years!), I picked up my copy of Gears of War 2. (Thanks again to Epic AI Programmer, Matt Tonks, for providing me with a copy of the game.)

Peek-a-boo

The AI in Gears 2 actually uses cover in a reasonably intelligent manner.

It took me a while to get back into the groove of the control system—most notably how to use their cover system. At the time, using cover that way was a fairly fresh idea. It has been utilized in plenty more games since then, of course. Even better was how the AI was using cover. Unlike other games that I have played where the AI either subscribes to the “Doom model” of standing out in the open, or half-heartedly takes cover, the AI in Gears 2 actually uses cover in a reasonably intelligent manner.

For example, compared to how the AI in Mass Effect used cover as two ends of a shooting gallery path, the AI in Gears 2 seems to take advantageous cover and keep it. This really adds some nice depth to the game in that, often, the only way to solve the resulting stalemate is to flank them so that their cover is less useful.

I can’t just sit there and play Whack-a-Mole.

Their “pop-outs” to fire on me are quite unpredictable which is frustrating (in a good way). Additionally, if the cover is long enough for them to move behind it, they seem to do so. Again, this is one of those things that, unless I was running a video recording, it would really be hard to discern in the middle of a firefight. What I do know, is that I can’t just sit there and play Whack-a-Mole with someone who is in cover—waiting with my cursor positioned perfectly so that when they pop up, I can pop them. That has always been a tactic that my slow thumbs relished because it was so simple to defeat. If the enemies are moving and popping up at unpredictable intervals, I either can’t anticipate where or when they will do so, or I simply get anxious and move on to another target that is visible.

As a follow -up to that last point, it is often hard to switch from one target to another in time because their exposure is so limited. They truly do only “pop out” rather than “come out and remain a really obvious, easy-to-hit target.” All of this serves to create a very frenetic atmosphere in the combat… even the “trench warfare” combat that could normally get pretty stale.

Round-and-Round

Unfortunately, there is some issue I take with the combat AI. Sometimes, both friend and foe seem to get into a mode where they are dashing around in odd ways. This seems related both to target selection (and by this I mean not just who to shoot but where to go) and idle situation positioning. In the former, it seems similar to what I experienced with Dragon Age: Origins. In that case, enemies would run past one of my allies—completely ignoring them—in order to get to me.

It simply doesn’t make tactical sense to leave your group like that.

In this situation, it isn’t necessarily limited to the enemy having an unhealthy preoccupation with me. My allies will run off into combat way out in front of what are obviously established lines. This surprises me quite a bit when I’m looking way downrange from our location (even sniping) and suddenly see one of my allies appear in my scope. It’s not as if I am holding back—often there is combat happening directly in front of us. In a game where one of the mechanics is being “revived” by one of your allies, it is disturbing when one of them runs so far afield. Even without that mechanic, the nature of this game is one of squad tactics. It simply doesn’t make tactical sense to leave your group and go deep into a group of enemies like that.

The issue (both friend and foe) could be solved by a better decision selection algorithm that takes into account proximity better. This could be achieved in two ways — first by scoring individual choices better (e.g. including better opportunity cost for cover points), or on the whole by including influence mapping. Certainly, influence mapping would then be rolled up into the decision-making process, but you could manage better mathematical decisions without necessarily inducing the overhead of an influence map.

There is no concept of “personal space“.

When the characters are supposed to be idle, I’ve had a number of situations occur where my allies were simply not paying attention to me or other allies. They will bump into me in an open area obviously trying to get to a spot on which I’m already standing or at least near to it. There is no concept of “personal space” even to the point of them trying to be in my space.

Sure, much of this could be solved by the inclusion of simple steering and separation algos, but I have to wonder if the decision of where to go isn’t being locked in too early and therefore overriding the sensibility of how to get there. What was a legitimate destination when you started there became a poor choice by the time you were half-way. Therefore, you either look like an idiot going there in the first place or, once you get there, you immediately change your mind and go someplace else. This would certainly lead to some of the “running around” behaviors as well. The solution partially lays in updating your target location often. Sometimes, changing your target location is really not that big of a deal anyway. If your goal is simply a random walk, your destination is unknown to the observer and largely irrelevant anyway.

Working Together

One thing that I haven’t seen (yet?) is a good sense that the enemy is working together. I mentioned this in my First Look post on the game over 2 years ago. Having played plenty of Halo 3 and Halo: Reach, I’m used to seeing the “organized fall-back” behavior that was built into their enemy AI. Not seeing it here in Gears 2 is actually kind of startling by its absence. Certainly building in that kind of behavior goes beyond the AI brain of the characters. It needs to be designed into the levels, etc. That may not have even been an option for the Gears team much less a consideration. I just wanted to point out that I “felt” it not being there.

Anyway, I’m not done with Gears of War 2, so if anything else comes up, you will see it here.

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One Response to “Gears of War 2: Cover vs. Running Around”

  1. [...] Post-Play'em – Observations on Game AI « Gears of War 2: Cover vs. Running Around [...]

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