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Post-Play'em - Observations on Game AI


Splinter Cell: Conviction – First Look

I’ve been putzing with Splinter Cell: Conviction on and off in recent weeks. As a side note, my use of it has mostly been “off” because I find it frustratingly difficult, even on “normal”. That being said, I’m impressed with the game as a whole.

Too often in games can we do stuff that is completely ridiculous and people don’t even react at all.

One of the first thing I noticed was how “by-standers” react to me. If I’m crawling around on a wall or doing something else “odd”, they will turn and look or making some snarky comment. I like that in a game. Too often in games can we do stuff that is completely ridiculous and people don’t even react at all. In order to facilitate this, I assume that actions and/or locations were simply flagged as “odd” and broadcast to the people in the area.

Similarly, I like how the “Thief-like” environmental triggers can arouse the attention of the bad guys. The voice acting in this case really sells it. They are often very subtle about it, saying things like, “hey… I’m gonna go check something over there.” It could have been done in a more heavy-handed way (e.g. “I heard something over there.”)… but the way they did it almost projects how the AI is actually questioning itself. The minor difference makes you (the player) think more “I need to be more careful” rather than jumping straight to “Oh shit!”

Anyway, that isn’t what I was wanting to write about…

No Rails Here!

Obviously, being the type of game that it is, there are more than a few opportunities to lie in way for people. Early on, there was a point where I was waiting for a guy who was unaware of me. I found myself falling back on old gaming mentalities and trying to detect his “patrol route”. That has long been a staple of games—to the point where it has been ingrained in me.

I kinda just had to mentally will him in my direction.

Needless to say, the baddie didn’t follow a pattern of any sort. I kinda just had to wait him out and mentally will him in my direction. Plenty of that time was spent watching him not move at all. I actually wondered for a while if he was a static set-piece rather than an ambulatory one. He wasn’t… he was just alternating between hanging out and wandering around. It really did a good job of selling the idea that this guard was that reasonable mixture of responsible and bored to tears.

On the other side of the coin, when the guys are actually searching for me, the game does a good job of making them look reasonable in their search for me, but also looking somewhat unpredictable. They don’t do the standard “run right toward where the player should be” gameplan once they lose track of me. That would be too silly. Once they have “lost me”, however, they don’t just go searching around willy-nilly; they keep to a reasonable area. That makes for a lot of tense moments when you are holed up in a corner!

While they are searching, the agents do a good job of looking around with that slightly spooked feeling. They will swing their flashlights around—sometimes in radical changes of direction like they are either surprised by a noise or trying to catch me by surprise. I actually found myself just watching the AI search for me to see what all they would do. (Well… the fact that I was on the outside of a windowsill with nowhere to go was a factor.)

Down in Front!

The combat AI seems solid. Their reactions are decent and they usually take cover fairly well. I don’t believe they use cover quite as well as what I have been seeing in Gears of War 2 (which I am finally almost done with). Sometimes they seem to be on the wrong side of it. Not on my side, mind you… just on perhaps the 90° side of things rather than opposite me.

A guy ran up and hid along the side of the couch that I was crouching behind.

On the other hand, the enemies don’t seem to do as much pointless running around as they did in Gears. They might want to consider more than simply cover points, though. There was one moment where a guy ran up and hid along the side of the couch that I was crouching behind. I was so startled that he would run up to get within point-blank range of me that I was very taken aback.

They don’t seem to use their environment in as dynamic a way as F.E.A.R. did, but it doesn’t set them back. In fact, if they were flipping couches and knocking over bookshelves, it might have looked a little contrived.

You Really Get Around!

The pathfinding is decent (thanks, I’m sure, to the excellent navmesh work of my buddy Martin Walsh). I believe there was one moment early on where I saw someone backtrack 2 steps before doing a turn the other way as if he was on a grid. That may have been something else, however. I just remember noticing it because I knew ahead of time that the game was on a navmesh.

While the local avoidance on the streets seems OK, I think that the “personal space” buffer could have been increased slightly. People coming the other direction weren’t steering to go around me soon enough. That’s minor, though.

When I make Sam stop and reverse direction quickly while running, the animation reminds me a lot of the same action in Assassin’s Creed. I have to wonder if that is a coincidence or not.

All in all, I’m quite pleased with it so far. I do need to pay a bit more attention to the AI in the combat situations. On the other hand, the fact that I’m so distracted with staying alive means that the enemies are certainly doing their job well!

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One Response to “Splinter Cell: Conviction – First Look”

  1. [...] had noted in my “First Look” post that the enemies do a decent job focusing on the “last known position” mechanic that [...]

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