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Posts Tagged ‘Doom 3’

Left 4 Dead: First Look

Monday, February 23rd, 2009

Ok… half price weekend on Steam finally got me into Left 4 Dead. After watching all my TF2 buddies drifting away to this mysterious “other game”, I needed to jump in and take a look. Also, since it will likely be the buzz of GDC next month, I figured I had better have an idea of what it looked and felt like.

I have to admit that it’s a pretty groovy game. All the stuff we have heard so far is correct. The online, team play is cool. It’s so much better than most team shooters in that it seriously punishes you for separating from your cohorts too much. Also, because there is such a significantly different array of tactics that are necessary for playing as the infected, the versus mode is almost like having a second game. But that’s not what this column is about…

The big AI pull on Left 4 Dead is the “AI Director” that we have all heard so much about. In an interview with Edge Online, Valve’s Gabe Newell talks about all the nifty stuff they tried to take into account. Wikipedia even touches on the AI Director. It’s no secret that this tech was a big deal.

When I finally got to playing it, I was very impressed with it myself. Having played through some of the levels more than once (like No Mercy, for example), I am well aware that I don’t know where anything is going to be next. Compare that to other games where the 2nd time through you already have an idea of what is coming next… by the 3rd or 4th time, you have it down. I don’t like that amount of rigid predictability. With L4D, I have been on my toes at all times.

It does seem like it does a decent job of balancing the flow of the game. There are plenty of times when I’m “on the edge”. Compare this to the rubber banding I suspected in Doom 3 where it just seemed that the lower I got on health, the less damage the enemy did. The result was an (almost) asymptotic approach to 0 health. Exciting? A little. Contrived? Definitely. With L4D, this feeling is much more natural in that it is adjust the pacing of the enemies themselves rather than adjusting the abilities they present. Rather than the confusion of “why is this horrible monster doing very little damage now that I’m almost dead?”, I find myself saying “thank God they aren’t coming after us just now… I need to heal up a little!” It’s a subtle difference, but it is there.

That’s not to say that the game is always winnable in true rubber band fashion. On my first day of play, three friends and I played that last rooftop level of “No Mercy” about 8 times and kept coming up just short. It was exciting each time. Finally, we beat it by only barely dragging our asses into the chopper. Quite the getaway! As we reflected on what had happened (the game was new for all of us), I noted that every single time was different. Different monster placement, different ammo placement, different items, different pacing. We couldn’t do the same thing each time because the computer wasn’t doing the same thing. One time we used gas cans to light fires. The next time, I went looking for the gas cans… only to find that they weren’t there (they were across the level). The next time, there were no gas cans at all… just more propane tanks — which meant a different strategy entirely.

What I have found interesting is, while playing the infected (which I am having trouble getting the hang of), I can watch the other zombies “pop in” as they spawn. It’s kinda fun to see them do that. Oddly, I feel a strange kinship with them at that point. (“Yeah, right here buddy! We’re gonna get ‘em from this closet, right dude? Right? Hey… pay attention to me!”)

The other thing I get to watch as the infected is how their “idle” behaviors work. There are quite a few of them and they blend well. Admittedly, by their nature, zombies don’t have to be terribly engaging, but it is a nice touch to come around a corner or see a group far off actually doing stuff. Sometimes, I feel that the sensory distance is a little short, however. If a little beepy grenade gets every zombie in the same zip code to freak out, why doesn’t my shotgun wake them all out of their staggering stupor as well? Again, people just don’t model the sense of hearing well in games. *sigh*

The AI of your counterparts is pretty decent, for the most part. I’ve seen a couple of odd glitches, however. Therefore, I think I’m going to make that a separate post so I can possibly post some FRAPS-caps of them in action.

(As always, make sure you check the tags below to see what else I may have written about this game.)

First Encounter with F.E.A.R.

Monday, January 21st, 2008

Ok… this isn’t necessarily going to be a full-fledged review of all of the AI in F.E.A.R. (Monolith studios) Actually, to do that justice may take an entire book anyway. However, I have been playing it for a few days. One of the reasons that I had to get a hold of it anyway (I bought the Platinum Collection) is that I also got my hands on the SDK. It is a special treat to be able to see the actual code that went into making this ground-breaking gem of a game.

Anyway, I had a taste of the game a few months back via the downloadable demo from Gamespot. Even with that brief glimpse I was impressed. Now that I have been able to “dork with it” (research term) a little more, I have found myself saying a few things that surprise me.

“Son of a bitch! Where did he come from?”

This usually occurs when I fall into old patterns of thinking that the enemies are going to generally either stay put or move toward me in something resembling a direct assault. The first time this happened was on one of the more open, but box-laden arenas (which I am realizing was a design decision to show off this exact effect). I was slowly closing on a group of enemies… or at least where I thought they were (more on that later) when I get pegged from behind.

Now this isn’t a “Doom 3″ sort of assault (see my post on the subject) where the game either spawns a monster directly behind me or pops open a completely illogical hidden panel in order to literally kick me in the ass. As I thought about where this dude could have come from, I realized that it was one of the enemies that had been in front of me… but off to one side. He actually had circled around some obstacles and come up behind me. Sure, he probably didn’t realize that I had moved until he reached the spot where he had last seen me – but then rather than stand there, he continued on the only logical way I could have gone until he did discover me – and proceeded to politely pop a proverbial cap in my ass. Score one for the bad guys.

“Get your butt back here, wimp!”

Again, unlike shooters that I have played in the past, I encountered something that was actually almost frustrating in the novelty of it. It was realistic… which actually took some getting used to. When I would engage an enemy, they were just as likely to fall back as they were to move forward. I may take a shot or two at them only to see them walk, run, or dive around corners. They weren’t just going to cover, they were pulling back. This left me in the uncomfortable spot of having to move into a hostile environment where I knew dudes were camping for me… a position that I have always tried to put the enemy AI in. Now I know how effective it is – since I don’t really relish having to be the one doing the hunting.

“I don’t have all freakin’ day!”

Rather the opposite of above, I have tried to fall back to patterns of “agro-ing” the enemy and then dropping back to wait. As often as not, they don’t fall for it. If they know I’m there, they may very well not come for me – especially if I have nowhere to go. I’m used to being quite comfortable simply waiting around a corner with a shotgun to my shoulder ready to multi-perforate the first moving object that shows itself. I wait… and I wait… until I hear “Flush him out!” followed by that delightful ping of a grenade rattling around at my feet. Crap! But do they just come running dumbly around a corner like my cat hearing the food in his bowl? Nope… I gotta come to them.

“Would you show yourself, damnit?!?”

Somewhat related to the above is their stubborn insistence on using cover. Yeah, using cover is cool. We’ve been talking about it at GDC roundtables and message boards for years. For a while, AI programmers were all happy to use preset “cover points”. In a general sense, they looked good… but they were easy to exploit by just being in a place where that specific cover point was not truly a cover point at all. I get a feeling that these assholes would be perfectly comfortable playing hide-and-seek in a round room with a round pillar in the center of it. They seem to process cover the same way that a human does… “can this specific spot be seen by that dude over there?”

It gets really frustrating when I get into peek-a-boo mode with a guy. The enemy may position itself in the shadow zone of a strip of wall, a column or something to take cover. If I peek around one side, he will move a little to keep the cover between us. If I move to look around the other side, he moves also. There isn’t any invisible pre-defined spot that he’s on, he’s simply trying to not be seen. It pisses me off! Game AI is not supposed to act this way!!

“Quit acting like you guys like each other!”

[Cascade this from above...] If Ol’ Chuck there is running to cover like the little bitch that he is (my language gets salty when I’m pwning), do me a favor and let me gun him down like an arcade ducky. Do NOT annoy me with suppressing fire and all that military squad nonsense. He’s got his back turned and I want to blast him before he gets to that box because, once he gets there, we have already determined that he’s not going to show me anything more than the barrel of his gun for the next 20 minutes. You really are not helping me out by scattering an endless cornucopia of metal alloy in my general direction. It really is distracting and makes it awfully hard for me to jump out here in the middle of the doorway and calmly aim down the sight at his weenie little ass. You act as if he’s on the same team as you or something! What the hell is wrong with you, anyway? Sheesh!

“OK… that’s not funny anymore!”

This was my latest little adventure. I finally met up with one of these “Watchers”. They are like freakin’ Spiderman The Rabbit Puncher. The first time I saw one, I thought it was one of the hallucinations again so I didn’t think to actually shoot it until it walked up and bitch-slapped me… and then disappeared into the damn ceiling before I could blink. Uh. Ok… that was odd. Until, from the corner of my eye, I saw him (or his buddy) swing down from the ceiling, off the wall, over the desk, smack me on the butt again, and then perform a similarly frenetic egress.

For the next 3 minutes, I was twitching around all over the place like I was going through the DTs while on LSD. These two dudes were zipping up, down, “over, under, around and through” so as to keep striking me from behind. If I turned and saw them in time, they were just as likely to about face and retreat and replan. I began to realize that “replan” is exactly what they were doing. This wasn’t a pre-set script to whack me when I got to a certain location… they were making this up on the fly (crawl, leap, cling, whatever)! I finally managed to pop one with the shotgun but the other got me. I was too shaken by the fact that they were actually being clever that I had to quit… and start writing.

Damn.

I’m not sure what I want to do now. Crawl through a billion lines of AI code spread across 100 different AI classes so I know what they are doing… or keep playing so I can experience it more and maybe put myself into a position where I can actually understand some of the more esoteric stuff that I encounter in the code. Right now I’m too shaken up by my encounter with real AI to do either one.

Maybe I’ll go play Doom 3 instead. For some reason, creepy lighting and environments and stupid enemies is not as daunting as generically bland lighting and environments and monsters that actually act like they have a brain for a change.

Congrats to Jeff Orkin and company – I’ll see you next month at GDC. I will be honored and excited to meet you and “talk shop” such as it is. But don’t be surprised if I have a PTSD reaction and slug you before you get a chance flip over that damn table and hide behind it.

(More on F.E.A.R. AI at AIGameDev.com)

Doom 3: Pretty Wind-up Toys

Thursday, December 13th, 2007

I dug out my Doom 3 again specifically for this blog. I hadn’t ever finished it when I started playing it about a year ago. It sure was purty, but it just didn’t engage me the way that I was hoping it would. Anyway, my thought as I returned to my saved progress was “pay attention to the AI so I can review it.” As I played, I became a little unsettled – not by my progress in the game, but by my progress in my quest for AI. I finally had to come to a realization that seemed almost blasphemous or sacrilegious.

Doom 3 doesn’t have AI.

Sure, I know that statement is a little over the top. Let’s face it, the AI in Doom 3is better than that of games from when I was a kid in the 80s. But that is also the heart of the problem. Doom 3′s AI isn’t much better than what was in the original Doom in 1993. Considering the related concept of Moore’s Law, you would think thought that AI would have increased at a geometric rate similar to that of anything else in computing. It is with that expectation that I claim that Doom 3 “doesn’t have AI”. Looking backwards down a Moore’s Law curve of AI, one could make the statement that the AIs in the past approach zero… therefore being zero for all intents and purposes – especially in a relative sense to where they should be today. So… my statement is now qualified somewhat. (Why do I feel like I’m going to end up having an uncomfortable beer with someone from id at the GDC in February?)

The comparison to the original Doom (or Quake, et al) is not far from the truth, however. The state machine has to look something along the lines of:

  1. Idle
  2. Agro
  3. If has ranged weapons – fire
  4. If no ranged weapons – approach target
  5. If health <= 0 then Die

That’s it. In the newer versions, you can splice in something towards the end that involves a side-step. The bad guy marines especially will do this. To me, the player, this makes me do the very involved strategic and tactical process of… uh… re-aiming my gun. Wow.

Admittedly, there are some baddies that give me more fits than others because they are not approaching me in a straight line. Lost Souls tend to zip around like gnats once they get close to you which is mildly annoying and Cacodemons will float around as you shoot them – but that means they have as much AI as a helium-filled piñata. There are other differences as well. The half baby/half fly Cherubs will back off a bit, prepare a moment, and then leap. Of course, so do the little spider things.

This is a major let down. I remember seeing some in-game clips at a game conference during an interview with Carmack. (I believe it was at E3.) The scene where the pink baddie tried to beat down the door, gave up and instead came crashing through the window was terrifying! “Wow! It gave up and used the window!” I told myself. When I played the game… and that exact same sequence happened, I realized that the whole thing was scripted. Oh. Bummer. Again, it wasn’t AI. Unlike F.E.A.R, where the agents do use their environment and re-plan when faced with obstacles such as the door above, the Doom solution was a movie crafted for my benefit.

I have been flanked by the computer, however. This I admit. Often! But that has nothing to do with the AI and everything to do with the placement of triggers. In true horror movie fashion, the computer does come up behind you often – but only because a designer placed a trigger on the floor that says “when player gets here, spawn evil dude behind him”. That isn’t AI. It isn’t even fake AI. In fact, it’s getting rather tiresome to know that every step I take is likely to generate an attack from a place I just cleared out. It makes for great anxiety and twitchyness – which is great for a horror movie. I admit that I have a good deal of tension when I play the game not knowing from which dark corner or what hidden panel I will receive the next assault. But it’s not AI. Really, it’s like making the “only average” fastball pitcher harder to hit by moving him closer to the plate or allowing him to throw from foul territory. He isn’t a better pitcher now… he just has been given an artificial advantage.

Really, the movement and attack logic for the enemy is not much more advanced than the little table-top wind-up toys. They will chatter away in my general direction, but there isn’t much purpose or reactivity to their actions. That gets very disappointing.

There does seem to be a bit of cheating going on, as well. The first time I fought a Mancubus, I was doing my best to flank him around walls. Despite having moved at least 60° off to the side, when I poked my nose around the wall to take another shot, I found he was already facing right at me. The explanation would have to be that there is omniscience on my position. Here, I had decided to do a simple, but what I thought clever, evasive maneuver only to have the game say “tough… I don’t care”. It’s deflating to have that happen.

There also may be some cheating going on for my benefit as well. This doesn’t fall exactly into AI, but it is relevant nonetheless. I swear that I take less damage per attack when I am almost dead. I haven’t done the math yet, but it seems that I can be in the teens or single-digit health for far longer than I spend in any other 10-number range. A hit that takes me down from 100 to 80, for example, may also only take me from 15 to 10. The result is that I spend a ton of time between 0 and about 40. Of course, if this is happening, this is a great device for creating tension in the game – and is a variant on rubber-banding. It’s rather artificial and arbitrary, though.

All in all, Doom 3 is a pretty game. It’s gorgeous. It’s use of dynamic lighting was cutting edge and very impressive for 2004. However, when you put it up against the interactivity and dynamicity of other shooters, there is something empty about it. It’s like trying to engage in a dialog with paintings in the Louvre. They are very impressive as art – but they aren’t going to talk back.

I have always respected John Carmack for his vision – and the “visions” that his games have provided for me. I just can’t help wondering what would happen if they were to put a bit more focus on AI. I notice on the Wikipedia site that Johnathan Wright is listed as an “AI Programmer” but that in the credits for Doom 3, he is just listed as a “programmer”. I would love to sit with him at a GDC party and have that beer. “What’s up, dog? Is there anything else you could be doing?” I can’t blame him, necessarily. Given the depth of the graphics rendering, he may very well just be out of clock cycles. *shrug* I hope that he has a better chance in the future. I would very much like to see an id offering that does “speak to me.”
Until then… there’s more than enough to challenge me elsewhere.
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